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Transcriptions Team

Transcriptions is created by a team of UCSB English Department faculty, graduate students, undergraduate students, and staff working in an environment of shared technology. Alan Liu is Principal Investigator of the project.


Faculty

Charles Bazerman, Professor of English and Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is interested in the social dynamics of writing, rhetorical theory, and the rhetoric of knowledge production and use. His most recent book The Languages of Edison's Light is forthcoming from MIT press. His previous books include Constructing Experience, Shaping Written Knowledge: The Genre and Activity of the Experimental Article in Science; The Informed Writer: Using Sources in the Disciplines; and Involved: Writing For College, Writing for Your Self. Current projects include a rhetorical theory of literate action and an investigation of environmental information. He is designing a Transcriptions course on "History of Written Culture."


Alan Liu Alan Liu is a Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has taught since 1988. He taught previously in the English Department and British Studies Program at Yale University. His central interests include literary theory, cultural studies, information culture, and British Romantic literature. Currently his research centers on a long-term project titled The Future Literary: Literary History and the Culture of Information, the first half of which is nearing completion as a book titled The Laws of Cool: The Cultural Life of Information. His major web projects include: The Voice of the Shuttle: Web Page for Humanities Research and Palinurus: The Academy and the Corporation--Teaching the Humanities in a Restructured World. He is the originator and director of the Transcriptions project. He teaches Transcriptions courses on "The Culture of Information," "Hyperliterature," and "Theory of Postmodernism."


Christopher Newfield Christopher Newfield, Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, works in the fields of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature; literary and social theory; and gender, sexuality, and race studies. He is currently working on a book about corporate cultural studies entitled Business Futures. His previous books include The Emerson Effect: Individualism and Submission in America and two co-edited collections, After Political Correctness and Mapping Multiculturalism. He will be teaching courses on "Business Culture" and "Global California" for the Transcriptions project.

Carol Pasternack Carol Braun Pasternack is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her areas of interest include Old and Middle English literature; history of the English language; oral and textual history; and gender in the Middle Ages. Her current project is a book entitled Questions of Gender in Anglo-Saxon England. She is the author of Textuality in Old English Poetry and co-ediotr of Vox intexta: Orality and Textuality in the Middle Ages. She is a strong proponent of collaborative instructional experiments and has made the Web an important part of her recent Introduction to Literature courses. She teaches Transcriptions courses on "Scroll to Screen" and "The Imperial Text."

Mark RoseMark Rose
is Professor and Chair of the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His areas of interest include Renaissance literature, Spenser, Shakespeare, Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, and legal and literary history in the Early Modern period. He is also an international authority on intellectual property and copyright issues. His most recently published major projects include his book titled Authors and Owners: The Invention of Copyright, an edited collection of critical essays on Shakespeare's early tragedies, and The Norton Shakespeare Workshop CD-ROM. He will be teaching a course on the history of authorship for the Transcriptions project.


William Warner
William Warner, Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, works in the following fields: the Enlightenment; the novel; the history of media culture from the eighteenth century to the present; and free speech and censorship. His most recent book is Licensing Entertainment: the Elevation of Novel Reading, 1684-1750. He is developing web sites that advance the cultural study of the history of media as well as the new digital media. He teaches a Transcriptions courses on "Techno-Gothic" and "Cyborg Genealogies."



Graduate-Student Research Assistants


The following graduate students are active or past research assistants of Transcriptions. Research assistants participate in strategy meetings, Web page creation, course preparation, and technical support. They are active in both the intellectual and practical aspects of the project.


Robert AdlingtonRobert Adlington came to UCSB in 1999 from the University of Sussex, England, where he received an MA in English with a special focus on Critical Theory. His interests include Narrative, Memory, Spatiality and "blissful" texts. He is Head of Database Design for the new English Department website and is also a research assistant for Voice of the Shuttle. He is the 2000-1 graduate representative on the department's Technology Committee and has co-authored a Transcriptions topic page on Celebrity



Caroline Brehm is a graduate student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, specializing in the Early Modern English period. She has created a Transcriptions topics page on "Hypertheatre."


Laurie Ellinghausen Laurie Ellinghausen came to the University of California, Santa Barbara, from Ohio State University in 1997 after obtaining an M.A. in English with an emphasis on Renaissance literature. In addition to writing about issues of early modern authorship and intellectual labor, she wishes to employ information technology and digitized texts for the creation and implementation of new approaches to teaching both dramatic and non-dramatic early modern texts.

Robert HammRobert Hamm is a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Barbara, working on the Early Modern period. He has coauthored a Web site on Electrifying the Renaissance: Hypertext, Literature, and the World Wide Web; and he is also a research assistant for the Voice of the Shuttle and the Univ. of Californial Digital Cultures Multi-Campus Research Group.



Jennifer Hellwarth
recently completed her doctorate in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, specializing in Medieval and Early Modern English literature. Her dissertation is titled The Reproductive Unconscious in Late Medieval and Early Modern England. She is interested in using information technologies to explore the transition from oral to textual cultures.


Jennifer JonesJennifer Jones
is a graduate student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, specializing in both nineteenth-century British literature and contemporary culture of information. She is writing a dissertation on the sublime and the virtual that hybridizes her research on the Romantics/Victorians and the new millennium. She is also a research assistant for Voice of the Shuttle.



Gisela KommerellGisela Kommerell
is a graduate student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has a special interest in information theory and has created a Transcriptions page on this topic.


Christopher Schedler Christopher Schedler recently completed his Ph.D. in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara,with a dissertation titled, Modernist Borders of Our America. His work will appear in forthcoming issues of Arizona Quarterly, The Hemingway Review, and Texas Studies in Literature and Language. He teaches a Transcriptions course titled "Weaving Webs: Native American Literature, Oral Tradition, and Internet." He also keeps a topics page related to his course. After working with Transcriptions, he joined the Metacollege.com firm.

Jeanne Scheper is a PhD candidate in the Department of English, Managing Editor of Camera Obscura, and a member of the shadow performance art group Cave Dogs. She has written on the torch singer (and sworn technophobe) Libby Holman and is currently working on a dissertation entitled, "Moving Performances: Traversing Trans-Atlantic Modernism, 1892-1940" that pays special attention to disidentificatory performances that stage transvestic moves, racial passings, and other unexpected cross-identifications. She is interested in exploring the pedagogical uses of technology, and in indulging luddite panic-technology fantasies..


Diana Solomon is a graduate student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has created a Transcriptions topics page on "Masquerade and the Web."


Vincent Willoughby
Vince Willoughby is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is currently completing his dissertation, entitled The Other Revolution: Romantic Writings and Technology and will be teaching at Georgia Tech University beginning in fall 2000. He is the author of A Yellow Wood, a website devoted to alternative careers for humanities PhDs commissioned by the English Department at UCSB, and co-author of Romantic Movements, a critical reexamination of space in the Romantic period, with Sheila Hwang of UCSB. His scholarly interests include technology in the romantic period, theories of technology, and postmodern criticism.

Jeen Yu Jeen Yu is a graduate student in English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She earned her B.A. in English in 1998 from California State University, Los Angeles, and has research interests in the Early Modern period. She wishes to explore intersections between early modern print and contemporary information technologies. She has created a Transcriptions topics page entitled "Cyber-scribes: from Manuscript to Hypertext," with fellow early modernist Mary Dudy, and is currently creating the Hypertext Resources page for Transcriptions with Robert Adlington.

 


Undergraduate Research Assistants

Eric FeayEric Feay is the graphics and design specialist for the Transcriptions project. He recently completed a double major in English and Philosophy at the University of California, Santa Barbara. While taking a course on literary theory from Alan Liu, he created a hypertext essay that eventually became a well-designed online work titled "Hypertext, or Anti-Linear Navigation." After that first experience with online hypertext,he trained formally in Web design and multimedia authoring. He is also creating a topics page for Transcriptions on the culture of digital and online gaming.

Eric Feay


Staff
Christina Nelson is Manager of the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She also serves as Administrative Supervisor and Budget Officer for the Transcriptions project, in charge of requesting and coordinating funding for the project.


Karen WhitneyKaren Whitney is the Computer and Network Technologist for the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the primary technical support specialist and system administrator for the Transcriptions Project. She managed network and computer systems in private industry in both Santa Barbara and Charlottesville, VA, before joining the English Dept. staff in fall 1999. Immediately after arriving, she concentrated on Y2K compliance, converting the English Dept. LAN to Windows NT, and upgrading the department's servers and workstations. (Here is a picture of her office shortly after she began.)



Machines

Lastly, honor is due the machines, past and present, that have shared in the labors of the Transcriptions team. In his Zen Computer (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1999), Philip Toshio Sudo suggests that as we sit down to boot up our computer we should first acknowledge it:

Before you start and after you finish working, make this one simple gesture toward your computer: Give it a nod. . . . For many of us, the computer is the means by which we earn a living. To give it a nod, then, is a way of thanking the tool for what it provides in life. It helps put bread on the table and a roof overhead. It gives us work and pleasure, exercises our minds, brings us information, connects us with other people. It is a partner helping us achieve our goals.

Nodding also thanks the unseen hands and minds who helped create our machine. . . .

(pp. 40-41)



Here is a nod to the secret life of the project's technology.



This page created by Chris Schedler and Alan Liu for the Transcriptions Team, 1/26/99
(revised 11/12/00)
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